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Archive for July, 2009

Films is one of the various types of digital objects represented by digital collections in Opening History aggregation.

Full version of the Alan Lomax’s Dreams and Songs of the Noble Old film (58 min., 1991), courtesy of Folkstreams digital collection of documentary films about American folk or roots culture. More information about this digital collection can be found at .

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American pilot Amelia Earhart was born on July 24, 1898, in Atchison, Kansas. She became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic and to fly solo from Hawaii to California. She perished during a flight from New Guinea to Howland Island over the Pacific Ocean on July 3, 1937.

The photograph below, courtesy of Illinois Digital Archives, features Amelia Earhart and a World War I flying ace Howard Knotts at Municipal Airport, Springfield, Illinois, in 1934.

Amelia Earhart and Howard Knotts at Municipal Airport, Springfield, Illinois, 1934

Amelia Earhart and Howard Knotts at Municipal Airport, Springfield, Illinois, 1934

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On July 15, 1916, William Boeing and George Conrad Westervelt incorporated Pacific Aero Products (later, Boeing). The airplane company was started in the hangar on the shore of Lake Union in Seattle, Washington, in December of 1915. The first airplane produced at this small factory was B & W seaplane, named after its designers, Boeing and Westervelt. The seaplane, constructed of spruce lumber, steel wire, and linen fabric, made its first successful flight over Lake Union on June 15, 1916. Only two B & W seaplanes were built; both were sold to the New Zealand government to be used for pilot training there.

On the photo below, courtesy of Seattle Historical Society Collection, part of a larger King County Snapshots: A photographic heritage of Seattle and surrounding communities digital collection, men are pulling B & W into Boeing Seaplane Hangar on Lake Union, Seattle, in 1916.

	Men pulling B & W into Boeing Seaplane Hangar on Lake Union, Seattle, 1916

Men pulling B & W into Boeing Seaplane Hangar on Lake Union, Seattle, 1916

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The Bisbee Deportation started on July 12, 1917 as vigilantes kidnapped and deported nearly 1,300 striking miners and others from Bisbee, Arizona.

The photograph of Sacramento Pit open copper mine at Bisbee, Arizona, below, courtesy of Indiana University, Charles W. Cushman Photograph Collection.

Sacramento Pit - famous open copper mine at Bisbee, Ariz., 1952

Sacramento Pit - famous open copper mine at Bisbee, Ariz., 1952

Mining history is one of the subject strengths of the Opening History aggregation. More than thirty digital collections — including Charles W. Cushman Photograph Collection, the source of the image featured in this post — contain materials on this topic, while five collections listed below specifically focus on mines, mining, and miners:
Coal Mining in Illinois, Machine vs. Man,
Doc Horrell Photo Collection,
Mining and Mother Jones in Mount Olive .
Mining in Idaho,
Thar’s gold in them thar hills: Gold and gold mining in Georgia, 1830s-1940s.

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171 years ago, on July 8, 1838, Ferdinand von Zeppelin, (1838–1917), German inventor of the rigid dirigible was born. The photograph below, courtesy of Title Insurance and Trust / C.C. Pierce Photography Collection, 1860-1960, part of a California Historical Society Digital Archive collection, features a giant Graf Zeppelin dirigible in ca. 1929.

The Graf Zeppelin airship, ca.1929

The Graf Zeppelin airship, ca.1929

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On July 6, 1885, Louis Pasteur gave the first successful anti-rabies inoculation to a boy who had been bitten by an infected dog. The photograph below, courtesy of 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire Digital Collection, pictures 1906 San-Francisco earthquake refugees receiving inoculations at the refugee camp.

Innoculation at refugee camp (1906)

Innoculation at refugee camp (1906)

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